Meet STOMP Out Bullying's Teen Ambassadors

The "Stand UP" Generation

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Krysten Moore
National Youth Ambassador
STOMP Out Bullying™


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Sarah Alcoster
California
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Brandonn Baez
New York
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Sayoni
Bandyopadhyay
New Jersey
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Elena Brown
Los Angeles
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Lillian Cheeks
California
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Kevin-Curwick
Minnesota
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JT Faccone
North Carolina
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Mikaela Frias
Washington
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Faith Garcia
California
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Blake Graham
South Carolina
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Isabelle Hadala
Florida
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Jazz Jenkins
New York
Arashdeep Kaur
Arashdeep Kaur
Arizona
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Jenna Leventhal
Ohio
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Alexander Levy
St. Louis
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Danielle Nisim
California
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Kulin Oak
Michigan

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Malika Paijurri
California

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Rosie Ruiz
Texas
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Brandon Schloss
Florida

Krysten Moore
National Youth Ambassador
STOMP Out Bullying™


Krysten_web.jpgBorn and raised in New Jersey, 28 year-old Krysten Moore graduated University of Massachusetts - Amherst, as the last remaining female in the Class of 2012 and is an Engineer at Amazon.

She joined Love our Children USA in 2003 and STOMP Out Bullying in 2005 and has completed over 8,000 hours of community service and is the recipient of “The President’s Call to Service” Lifetime Volunteer Service Award; an Honorable Mention Recipient of the “2007 Nestlé’s Very Best in Youth” Awards; and was named as one of Next Step Magazine’s “2008 Super Teens of New Jersey”.

Krysten held the title of “Miss Bergen County” where her platform was the Education and Prevention of Childhood Bullying” and was one of the "2012-2013 Boston Bruins Ice Girls" cheering on the Boston Bruins and acting as a Boston Bruins Charitable Ambassador.

Through her middle school experience, she was bullied by two boys who first decided to use their words as weapons against her. The cafeteria became a battlefield as horrific remarks like "Krysten wants MOORE food" and “Move it whale” were shot her way; then lockers soon became landing pads as she was shoved in the hall. Their words stung as if she was the recipient of a left hook to the right eye. At the age of eleven, Krysten realized the power of vocabulary… be it positive or negative.

As if in-school bullying wasn't enough to terrify her; Krysten’s middle school bullies took it to the next level and became inescapable when they moved beyond the school grounds to the privacy of her own home. The attacks that had once subsided with the ringing of the final bell at 3:00 pm suddenly turned into people posing online as a boy who liked her, only to make fun of our conversation the next day in school. Websites were created posting false and crude remarks about her, slowly diminishing her confidence.

Determined to take a stand, Krysten adopted some very powerful words of her own. Her words are not intended to cause harm but rather to inspire. As the National Youth Ambassador for STOMP Out Bullying™ Krysten has visited numerous elementary and middle schools speaking first hand about the negative effects of bullying.

She had the honor of being a guest speaker at the 2007 Third Annual New York State Cyber Security Awareness Conference on behalf of STOMP Out Bullying™; the 2008 Second Annual Junior League of Bergen County StarPower event and the 2012 Victoria Secret Fashion Show Premiere Party to benefit STOMP Out Bullying™. Krysten also appeared on The Rachael Ray Show and the CBS Early Show with STOMP Out Bullying™ Founder and CEO Ross Ellis.

In her junior year of high school (2006-2007), she founded SHINE, (Students Helping Instill New Esteem) an in school program allowing other students to join her in educating children as young as kindergarten. In 2007 SHINE was chosen as one of the top 100 new organizations by the Case Foundation. Its goal is to impart on children the same importance to be considerate and respectful as we do for them to be great athletes. Encouraging the understanding and acceptance of each others differences is the first step towards changing negative behaviors.

With one small gesture we can change a persons life……whether it’s changed for better or for worse depends on the gesture we choose.