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June is Pride Month

Pride-2022.jpgWhether those you love are of the same gender, opposite gender, transgender or gender neutral, who you love is who you love. It is for you to decide.

Pride is much more than a month, it’s how you honor and celebrate your everyday moments, big and small, from transitions to coming out to honoring your chosen family or starting one of your own. It’s a time to capture all the unique and simple life moments that make you one-of-a-kind, alive with pride, meaningful, and remarkable.

Alive-With-Pride.pngCelebrate all of the color and diversity of PRIDE
with STOMP Out Bullying!

Step up and show your support for the LGBTQIA+ community during the entire month of June. That’s right, the entire month is dedicated to uplifting the LGBTQIA+ community and celebrating diversity, equality, and visibility.

Alive With Gay Pride 2022

Celebrate PRIDE

There are many ways to celebrate Pride, from learning the movement’s history to supporting the diverse array of LGBTQIA+ voices, to supporting local LGBTQIA+ businesses and charities, to being an ally to your friends and family who identify as LGBTQIA+. No matter how you celebrate Pride Month, it is a time to get together and stand together with the LGBTQIA+ community in its fight for equality and LGBTQIA+ justice.

To help get you in the spirit, we’ve put together a few ideas that capture the joy and self-expression of Pride Month, however you choose to observe it.

Wear Your Pride
Wear it loud, wear it proud all summer long and throughout the year. What better way to display your support of Pride Month than to rock LGBTQIA+ friendly clothing? Get Pride ready - ALIVE WITH PRIDE.

Alive With LGBTQIA+ Pride 2022

This year we've done something special for PRIDE. We designed this shirt, with our LGBTQIA+ family in mind. As an organization whose work includes educating against bullying, homophobia, LGBTQIA+ discrimination, racism, and more, we created this soft tee with our “Alive with Pride” slogan for you to rock during Pride Month and beyond. LGBTQIA+ pride does not end in June, and neither does our support.

Host a Mini Pride Parade or Party
Whether you’re celebrating with family or friends, here are some Pride-themed ideas to try:

  • Serve up a rainbow-themed array of delicious finger foods and treats—display rainbow-colored decor and queue up a playlist of LGBTQIA+ artists. 
  • Host a mini-parade in your neighborhood. Create custom garden flags, and wear your best Pride outfit as you take to the streets to show support.

Discover LGBTQIA+ Films, TV Shows, And Literature
Another great way to celebrate Pride Month is by developing a greater understanding of the LGBTQIA+ experience through films, TV shows, and literature. There are so many incredible movies, shows, and books by LGBTQIA+ creators that you and your loved ones can watch, read and discuss.

Celebrate the Journey by Learning the History of PRIDE

Pride is a time of recognition, appreciation and celebration of how far we have come in the struggle for gay rights. Learn about the history of the gay rights movement and the origins of pride. Discover for yourself how far we have come and how much further we have yet to go to achieve equality and respect for all.

Acceptance of the LGBTQIA+ community has taken decades of passionate struggle to achieve. There was a time not long ago when being gay was not accepted by society at all. Men and women were dismissed from the military, fired from their jobs, discriminated against in public and persecuted for being gay. 

The Lavender Scare

The 1950’s - The Lavender Scare

  • The US Senate Issued a report referring to homosexuality as a Mental Illness.
  • Thousands of gay men and women were discharged from the military and hundreds were fired from government jobs during the "lavender scare". 
  • President Dwight Eisenhower banned homosexuals from working for the federal government.
  • America’s first sustained national gay rights organization “the Mattachine Society” was founded. 
  • The first Lesbian rights organization “the Daughters of Bilitis” was founded.
  • The United States Supreme Court rules in favor of homosexuals for the first time in a case challenging the First Amendment rights of the first Pro-gay publication in the U.S. "One" Magazine.

The 1960's - Stonewall

  • The first Reminder Day was held by gay activists to call public attention to the lack of LGBT civil rights.
  • The New York Liquor Authority prohibited serving gay patrons in bars. The Mattachine Society sued the NYLA and although no laws were changed, the NYC Commission on Human Rights declared that gay patrons had the right to be served.
  • Following the “Compton’s Cafeteria Riot” LGBT activists established the National Transsexual Counseling Unit, the first peer-run support and advocacy organization in the world.
  • A riot lasting three days broke out between angry gay youth and police officers at the Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village, NY. The Stonewall riots mark a pivotal point in the Modern Gay Rights Movement.
Harvy Milk

The 1970’s - Harvey Milk

Red Ribbon

The 1980’s - HIV/AIDS

Don't Ask Don't Tell

The 1990's - Don't Ask Don't Tell

  • The Department of Defense issues a directive prohibiting the U.S. Military from barring applicants from service based on their sexual orientation. This policy is known as "Don't Ask, Don't Tell."
  • President Clinton signs the Defense of Marriage Act into law. The law defines marriage as a legal union between one man and one woman and that no state is required to recognize a same-sex marriage from out of state.
Gay Marriage

The 2000's - From Civil Union to Gay Marriage

  • 2000: Vermont becomes the first state in the U.S. to legalize civil unions and registered partnerships between same-sex couples.
  • 2004: Massachusetts becomes the first state to legalize gay marriage. By 2010 New Hampshire, Vermont, Connecticut, Iowa and Washington D.C. also legalize gay marriage.
  • 2008: California voters approve Proposition 8, making same-sex marriage in California illegal.
  • 2009: President Obama signs a Presidential Memorandum allowing same-sex partners of federal employees to receive certain benefits.
  • 2010: A federal judge in San Francisco decides that gays and lesbians have the constitutional right to marry and that Proposition 8 is unconstitutional.
  • The U.S. Senate votes 65-31 to repeal "Don't Ask, Don't Tell". Gays and lesbians are allowed to serve openly in the U.S. Military.
  • 2015The U.S. Supreme Court declares same-sex marriage legal in all 50 states.
  • 2020:  The U.S. Supreme Court Says Firing Workers Because They Are LGBTQ Is Unlawful Discrimination.

9 out of 10 LGBTQ students are harassed and bullied at school. 58% of LGBTQ youth reported experiencing depression and 45% seriously considered attempting suicide in the past year.

No student should ever be afraid to go to school, connect with their friends online – or worse – feel that their torment is so bad that they consider suicide as a way to end their pain. 

Since 2005 STOMP Out Bullying has helped over 5 million students resolve all forms of bullying situations. Our HelpChat Line has assisted over 100,000 students and saved over 2,000 lives. Through our various support networks we have saved over 6,000 lives. These numbers increase daily. Say NO to Bullying, Digital Harassment, Hatred, Racism and LGBTQIA+ Discrimination.

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